Making the most of your DVD player

DVD players are officially an interim technology since Blu-ray players have busted into the market. DVD players can however, with the right disc installed & a few other details, provide a picture so good that many will think a Blu-ray is playing. We see it all the time. Blu-ray players actually have the potential of providing the best picture your system can produce. Once you find a Blu-ray movie with the latest technology, the best cinematography, the lowest picture noise & graininess, you won't go back to the DVD version. However, at this point in time some Blu-ray movies are falling short in picture quality. There are still many DVD's available that will provide the premium experience you want.

DVD's come in many configurations. Double-sided, double-layered, letter boxed, full screen, anamorphic, enhanced for widescreen, 2.39:1, 1.85:1, remastered, restored, etc. Sometimes you will need a magnifying glass to read the cover of the disc because the print is so small. Cutting to the chase, the most important elements here are not the 1.85:1 ratio or the double-layer or the double-sidedness. The most desirable of these would be anamorphic (enhanced for widescreen) and remastered or digitally restored. 

Remastering and digitally restoration (for older films) may mean that someone noticed a shortcoming of the original print of the movie. (A print is referring to the process of playing the movie celluloid film into a video camera to convert the movie into the digital one and zeros that go onto a DVD). In most cases the new print picture quality has been monitored closely and is greatly improved upon.

"Anamorphic" is essentially the same as "Enhanced for Widescreen" and one of these terms on the movie cover ensures a higher resolution product. You want a DVD that says one of these on the label. Just because a DVD says Widescreen version does not mean it is the higher resolution print version. A comparison between an anamorphic and a non-anamorphic DVD generally shows a huge difference in picture quality. When I am searching for a particular movie, I make sure the labels states this or I won't buy it.

It is also a good idea to read reviews of movies you plan to buy to see if anyone makes a comment about the print quality. I have been steered more right than wrong by these sort of articles.

Assuming you have a high definition widescreen TV display, you should have your DVD player's setup menu set to 16:9 to play these anamorphic movies. Also you should have your DVD player setup for progressive scan rather than interlaced mode. The 16:9 display aspect ratio gives a 1.77:1 screen size which is necessary to accomodate the 1.85:1 or 2.39:1 pictures on widescreen movies. The latter numbers will give some black bars on the top and bottom, but this is necessary to make sure the screen is played back in the aspect the movie producer intended. Modern TV's have a stretch feature to stretch the movie to fully fill the screen. We do not recommend doing this as this will distort the shape of a person on screen.

Look for additions to this article in the future.

Bye for now.
The Personal Theatre Solutions
Monitor

The Personal Theatre Solutions
Monitor

The Personal Theatre Solutions
Monitor

The Personal Theatre Solutions
Monitor

The Personal Theatre Solutions
Monitor

The Personal Theatre Solutions
Monitor